Stuff on Trees

I try to get out for a long walk with Penny every other day at least, in addition to her regular loops that we do in our woods. Yesterday afternoon, we hiked two and a half miles up on our adjoining forest land. It was a great early fall day but bird activity was very light so after spotting this fungal growth, I decided to focus on what I could find on trees.

One nice thing about fungi is that they stay still for photographs. The cauliflower-like growth is apparently called Sparassis (also known as cauliflower mushroom)

One nice thing about fungi is that they stay still for photographs. The cauliflower-like growth is apparently called Sparassis (also known as cauliflower mushroom)

The route we took climbs up into some pretty rough country which is pretty damp and filled with soft maples and other trees very susceptible to growths and deformities.

Penny loves to explore openings like this, hoping that a critter is home.

Penny loves to explore openings like this, hoping that a critter is home.

This tree is doomed from all the fungal growth.

This tree is doomed from all the fungal growth.

At the high point of our hike I began to look for a growth that has fascinated me for years. The first time I saw it I thought it was a small bear — and when the grandkids were young, took them up by it with some made-up story about it.

In this long election season, this now reminds me of an old elephant, with many options for analogies which I'll keep to myself.

In this long election season, this now reminds me of an old elephant, with many options for analogies which I’ll keep to myself.

This looks like a Pileated Woodpecker was at work.

This looks like a Pileated Woodpecker was at work.

Fungus killed this tree which was down across the trail.

Fungus killed this tree which was down across the trail.

This deformity is called a burl (I think.) It was much larger than it appears in the photo.

This deformity is called a burl (I think.) It was much larger than it appears in the photo.

One of the things I notice about naturalists on bird walks that they are interested in about everything. It’s a good lesson for me to keep in mind, especially in transition seasons when the birds are sparse. The fresh air, sunshine, exercise, and watching our old Vizsla romping through the woods made it a great outing. We are blessed.

The sign marking the end of our jaunt -- made many years ago by the first owner of the property.

The sign marking the end of our jaunt — made many years ago by the first owner of the property.

This entry was posted in Fungi, Local Birding, nature, Vermont Birding, Vizsla. Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Stuff on Trees

  1. John Snell says:

    “This tree is doomed from all the fungal growth.” Rather the dying tree, not sure of the cause, is providing a home for the fungal growth.

    The “elephant” is a chaga. Check out Wiki and learn more about it. Fascinating.

    Glad you enjoyed your walk!

  2. Heather Campbell says:

    Fun times; wish I had been there. You first photo is a hericium, known as lions mane, one of the best edibles and not similar to anything harmful. That said, it does look a bit past prime.

Comments are closed.