Teacher, Teacher, Teacher

Ovenbirds seem to thrive in our woods.  Each morning, I hear six or more calling back and forth and sometimes, there seems to be even more.  But to see them is another thing.  They can be right next to you calling but if they don’t move, they blend with the forest floor and the low branches.  I always am surprised at how small they are – given their loud voice.  The other morning, two were courting or fighting, and not only did I get a good look, but one perched on a branch 10 feet away.  Of course, it was on of the few dog walks were I left my camera home.

Yesterday morning, I got lucky.  I saw a cooperative Ovenbird who sat still long enough for me to find him in the branches and take a couple of shots.

It's a tough life being a small migratory bird. Studies estimate that half of all adult Ovenbirds die each year. The oldest known Ovenbird was seven years old.

It’s a tough life being a small migratory bird. Studies estimate that half of all adult Ovenbirds die each year. The oldest known Ovenbird was seven years old.

You can see just a bit of the orange crown bordered by black stripes.

You can see just a bit of the orange crown bordered by black stripes.

The other fun fact from my perspective is that Ovenbirds are usually low – on the forest floor or low branches.  They are great for birders, like this one, with a pinched neck nerve.

 

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3 Responses to Teacher, Teacher, Teacher

  1. Great shots, Dick!

  2. Larry says:

    Great Ovenbird photo! trying to take photos of birds is on my list of thins to try this year. I’m wondering if I’m biting off more than I can chew as I’ve only used a kayak a couple of times.

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