The Usual Suspects

Down in Massachusetts for a few days visit, I decided to take Penny birding yesterday morning at one of my favorite spots, Salisbury Beach State Reservation. If you get there early, even on a weekend, there are few people around. Later in the morning, it seems like every dog walker in the area descends on the place.

I had just turned on to the access road when I saw a Northern Harrier working the salt flats, hunting low over the ground, swooping and soaring in the way that I just love to watch. It was too far off for photos but a great start — first I’ve seen this year.

The ocean was pretty dramatic with a stiff wind and high tide and as far as I could tell, no birds.

The ocean was pretty dramatic with a stiff wind and high tide and as far as I could tell, no birds.

Several House Finches were in the shrubbery along the walkway to the beach.

Several House Finches were in the shrubbery along the walkway to the beach.

After seeing several large dogs cavorting off leash along the beach, I decided to move inland. We ran into a host of species and Penny had a chance to race around a bit around the vacant campground. Perhaps the most interesting were the Song Sparrows, which were singing everywhere, and a half-dozen Northern Mockingbirds.

The mockingbirds were going through their repertoire - fun to hear and see.

The mockingbirds were going through their repertoire – fun to hear and see.

Mocker1AW

 

Even House Sparrows got into the act.

Even House Sparrows got into the act.

We headed toward the boat launch area and noted several large groups of Brant.

The Brant breeds in the high Arctic tundra and winters along both coasts.

The Brant breeds in the high Arctic tundra and winters along both coasts.

It was a nice morning outing, relatively quiet since many migrants have yet to arrive. Both Penny and I got some nice exercise and fresh air. We’ll be back again until they start charging $14 per car when the beaches open up.

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